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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in 2009, activities began with president-elect and mrs. obama attending church services across from the white house. they went to the white house and the motorcade for the coast and the inaugural address. here is a look at the activities from 2009. ♪ >> how are you? [sirens] [cheers and applause] ♪ [cheers and applause] >> good morning. [cheers] [cheers and applause] >> you ok? >> yeah, i'm fine. ♪ cheers and applause ♪ [cheers and applause] [cheers] >> ready to go? >> we have senator biden in the other room. >> present. ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the chief justice of the united states, john g. roberts jr. and the associate justices of the supreme court of the united states. ♪ >> how are you? good morning. >> ladies and gentlemen, william bailey, john rogers jr., patrick g. ryan, cochairs of the inaugural committee. and the executive director of the 56 presidential inaugural committee. ♪ ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president elect [indiscernible] >> how are you? >> you are my hero. >> thank you. thank you for taking care of those people from indiana. >> great to s
to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 2012 to the u.s. senate's and one of 20 women sworn in earlier this month, the most ever in our nation's history. no one runs for senate alone. no one runs for senate alone and wins. i was never alone, not for a singesingle minute. you were with me every single step of the day. back in may 2011 when the senator announced that he was retiring, i convened a conference call to figure out whether there was a way i could step up and run. just like you have been with me for so long, emily's list was there for me at that moment. you were there day one when i ran for the house of representatives bac in 1998. the pungent scent i cannot win. you read there with me. -- you were there with me every step of the way. i became the first woman to represents a woman in the house o. and on the first day of this long journey you were there for me with sage advice, plenty of encouragement and a commitment to stand with me every single day. you follow it through and then some. thousands of yo
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact that and have them sign this very historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it does not sit in the president's piu anymore but it is one of those great pieces of history long associated with this church from 1856 to the present. one of the little-known facts about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, a worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. a lot of people feel that is something of a longstanding tradition, and it's not. it actually began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1943, when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the zero art -- before he took the oath of office in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and organized a special service with his former headmaster who participated with the church in coming up with a special service. they had that service at st. that was the felt way to start. he wrote letters later on saying he felt he got his administration off to the right f
it an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corp., sheila bair. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. >> in 2009, president obama attended a service at st. john's applicable church from across the white house. and they went to the capital for the health and inaugural address. here is a look from the activities of 2009 carried . [applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen. the chief justice of the united states and the associate justices of the supreme court of the united states. ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, mr. william m daley, mr. john w rogers junior, mr. patrick g ryan -- cochairs of the 56th presidential inaugural committee. and the executive director of the 56 presidential inaugural committee. ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president elect cabinet. >> you are my hero. >> thank you. >> inks for taking care of those people from indiana. -- thanks for taking care of .hose people fr
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
to do this by e elect trail means. they had to win an election. they weren't confidence about that. there was an incredible a. para military violence that went in to. and the results very uneven. thag how they went out of the union. what proceeded that? when you're in a meeting and everything unanimous. don't you get suspicious? i do. there was a lot of back story to how thigh pulled it off. other places the back story showed. in alabama the up country representative just charged they were being run out of the union with that democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia looked tat and said no ordinary farmer has voted for this. they have run us out of the union without the consideration of democratic process. i think it's interesting it's revealing what democracy was and innocent a slave regime in 1860. they called it a democracy. they sometimes often made the case what they wanted was a republican and democracy was mob of course sei. it was part of the reason they wanted out of the union. they didn't like the direction it was going. they had to play the game to get
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
for re-election, the president is free to pursue the agenda that will enshrine him. among america's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrai
is in this election, the most recent election, that the future of our country kind of showed up and voted in a way that no one was really expecting that they would given what you surmised which was a sense of perhaps disillusionment or in the professor's words, the revival being over. but in fact, i think they came back more seasoned, more realistic, more determined to do the hard work to bring about the kind of political consensus that we need and particularly in the state of maryland, if you look at the two issues that were passed on referendum the religious communities, the immigrant communities, people of color, they all came together in ways that totally surprised the expectations given what was perceived to be such a mood of pessimism, even just months before. >> what about you, professor trulear? do you sense any little glimmer of hope anywhere that things can be better? >> oh, i think there's a lot of hope. i think that it's just more grounded in reality, which is, i think, the gist of the bishop's comments that there is a sense that there were things that were accomplished during the firs
elections of lower saxony is busy choosing their parliament and the result is looking extremely close. it is being seen as a dress rehearsal for several elections in september and a verdict on chancellor angela merkel herself. david mcalester represents her party and is close to her. the poll suggests is neck-and- neck with the opposition social democrats and the green party. with go live now to hand over. what is the latest you are hearing there? >> the latest we are hearing is that it's going to be a long night. we will have to wait for the regional polling stations to be counted. the parties are really neck-and- neck and it could be angela merkel's christian democratic union or it could be the greens and social democrats. this is a bellwether region. this has farmers, big industry, europe's biggest automaker, volkswagen is located here. the religious split is catholic and protestant. what happens here is will what happened across the country generally speaking. that is why angela merkel made seven campaign stops here along with david mcallister, the christian democratic premier in
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
are seeing since the elections, that's for sure, a question who he will be, as he moves into the second term slam. lot of talk about lincoln's second inaugural, which i think by standards is the gold standard and the greatest of the second inaugural addresses that we know. >> because? >> because it came at the pivotal moment of maximum peril for the nation and it was a real statement about how we could be larger as a democracy and reembrace those who had been against the country and come back together. but i have been looking at franklin ross vel's second inaugur inaugural, 1937, which is interesting, because it was a very can candid, honest progress report about what had not yet been accomplished coming out of the great depression but also a statement how we had to come together, useself government as the most noble expression. and use very precise terms, if you go back and look that the speech there is very real room for president obama now to say to the country, these are the things that will are left undone that we, together, must find a way to do >> michael, as a speechwriter first, who
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relationship. there will be that give and take. >> at the end of the day when the speech is over, you will consider it a success if? >> if people feel better about america. i hope first it's short and second makes them feel better about the country and times they live in. >> i think if he calls attention to real problems in honest ways, but then asserts there's hope beyond the divisions of our current politics. >> tha
where i come from something as basic as free, democratic elections, that is a luxury. people participate in the democratic process. that is something that is quite amazing and remarkable. i think that you do not fully appreciate it if you have had it all your life. whereas someone who came from a place where that was not possible, i think that i have a unique appreciation for it. it was really an exciting thing to do. >> where would you place yourself now on the political spectrum? the left, the right? supervisor campos: i think the labels can mean a lot of different things. i see myself as someone who ultimately has tried to make things better for people. i have a progressive outlook in terms of how i see things. by progressive i mean the sense that we have to make government and the city work for everyone, and that means that not just those who are doing well. it is also those who are not doing so well. it also means making sure the city works for the middle class and to think of innovative ways of addressing issues and to not be afraid to think outside the box. that is what i see as b
rating gets a downgrade. >> now, where were we? >> we were here, 2012. election year. what could possibly go wrong? ♪ i'm so in love with you >> how big a deal that the president sings? is it true he has a good voice? ♪ so in love with you >> major developments. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> supreme court holds obama care is constitutional. democrats hold convention, obama holds clinton. campaign push, presidential debate, presidential dud. >> now four years later, we still have trillion dollar deficits. >> presidential improvement. >> i don't look at my pension, it isn't as big as yours. it doesn't take as long. >> presidential victory. a time to look back at sports teams, disaster, promises kept, most troops out of iraq, sports teams, disaster. upheaval, khaddifi dead. sports teams, sports teams, promises broken. guantanamo still open. disaster, tragedy. ft. hood, tucson. >> our hearts are broken by their sudden passing. >> colorado, newtown. >> for those of us who remain, let us find the strength to carry on and make our country worthy of their memor
days after a tough re-election victory over republican mitt romney but right back to work for a president getting regular updates on the terror attack in algeria a reminder of the grave threat from al qaeda, one of many looming second-term challenges hanging over the swearing in where the aides say the address will bring the nation together. >> people here in washington need to seek common ground he will make that point. >> there are other signs suggesting the opposite such as defiant tone at the news conference last week and a new group made up of fore campaign aides now planning to pressure congress. >> i was surprised this week to see him transition the campaign committee into an ongoing campaign-style effort to have an impact on the washington debate because it doesn't seem the lesson of the first term that worked out very well. >> those battles begin again on tuesday, for now it is pomp and circumstance. >> starting with vice president biden getting sworn in after 8:00 a.m. because justice sotomayor had to rush to new york city for a book signing. >> we will walk out,
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
. then comes the election of barack obama and mitch mcconnell's announcement that his number one agenda item is to defeat president obama. we have, i think, a productive 2009 and 2010 and then in 2010, a group gets elected in the house, in particular, we don't believe in governance. not totally pessimistic. the way to go we've seen in the last three major issues in the house, a split within the republican party where main stream conservatives of the bob dole variety have aligned with the majority of democrats. they've been opposed by a majority of republicans in the house, but not of the whole house and speaker boehner, to his credit, has been allowing a coalition to come together and i hope what happens is that the main stream conservativism of the republican party continue to fight back. >> he hopes the republican party remains divided so democrats can get something done. >> no, i hope the conservatives in the republican party assert themselves the way they have in the last three votes and work with us and marginalize their eextreme wing. >> i have to tell you. >> i think that's the same t
, democratic senator chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." welcome to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially under way, this debate is well under way. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish with comprehensive gun control. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that, of course, lapsed in 2004, and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne la pierre of the nra on this program very hard when this initially came up, i challenge you as well with the question of is this really going to make a difference? and rich lowry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so
, planning and shown in the past election and maybe more so this time, to put tens of millions of dollars on behalf of gun control against candidates, couldn't this challenge the national rifle association, its influence? >> it's ironic that bloom berg is doing that. when you compare new york city to chicago, which is headed for a record number of homicides, new york city recorded the lowest homicides since 1960 ace, that's effective policing by the new york police department. and if michael bloomberg would put more into policing, chicago, st. louis, it would be better spent. >> paul: it's a challenge for the nra political clout. we'll see who wins. >> as president obama prepares to be sworn for for his second term, what is he hoping to accomplish? we know that guns are on the agenda, but from immigration ♪ ♪ pop goes the world pop in a whole new kind of clean th tide pods. just one pac has the stain removal power of six caps of the bargain brand. pop in. stand out. of six caps of the bargain brand. living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joi
in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater, you see, who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom if his early, chaotic days, enforced some order and discipline on the blythe spirits who ran national review, expanded a conservative movement through the tv program "the advocates," husband newspaper column and his -- his newspaper column and his lectures and championed ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor-turned--politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor, bill buckley. of whom he once said, quote: the most exasperating people in the world are so off
a first for our country, but also the fst and only to be rescheduled because congress delayed the election. andrew jackson was first sworn in on the east side of the capitol building and ronald reagan the first on the west. the shortest inauguration dress was george washington's second. six presidents have taken the oath outside washington. george washington first in new york, and then in philadelphia. john adams in philadelphia. chester arthur in new york. teddy roosevelt in buffalo. calvin coolidge in plymouth, vermont, and l.b.j. in dallas. james polk's inauguration was the first to be covered using the telegraph and war enharding's parade was the first to use cars. buchanan's inauguration was the first one photographed and william mckin le's was the first filmed. hoover's was the first in a movie newsreel. the first to be televised was harry truman and the first streams in the internets was bill clinton's second. lincoln's parade was the first to include african-americans acknowledged wilson's was the first to include women. bad weather moved some indoors. grants touched it out in 16 d
for the and not duration. a hard-fought campaign as both sides worked hard to try to get their candidate elected. this is a time for celebration. ♪ tonight, the kids got their turn. katy perry kicked off the party hosted by michelle obama and joe biden to honor young americans. >> earlier in the day, the first family participated in the national day of service. tonight, several states are celebrating. oklahoma went red for mitt romney, but their party tonight is a bipartisan celebration of the presidency. >> it does not matter if we agree politically. we are all here because we love our country and we love the political system. >> rock stars like common tonight are d.c. dignitaries. he worked hard on this campaign and knows who he wants to dance with. >> i got a go with michelle obama. she is an incredible woman. she is from ch>> the message from these celebrities young voters can make a difference. >> do know the facts. get up and do it is cool right now, that is vote. the same thing that got obama to be president two times. that momentum. the people are going to create new demand. >> all of
the will of the world. the 1800 election may have been the most important election in world history because it was the first time power had been peacefully transferred after an election and this great healing moment. i think this president feels the way roosevelt did in '37. >> well, of course, nobody believes thomas jefferson and john adams snuck out of town ahead of time because he didn't want to be there to witness his defeater making that speech. so it wasn't exactly a healthy time but second terms have been rough. if i were obama, i wouldn't be paying attention to either of those speeching. i would be paying attention to the man on whose holiday this inauguration falls. >> martin luther king. >> martin luther king, because that is really what can make obama stand out. it was what made people excited about him in the first inauguration was this moment in history. it's yet another moment in history, and it comes on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. >> it's interesting, he's going to be taking the oath on lincoln's bib
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)

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